Eight Lies Of A Mother

 


This story begins when I was a child: I was born poor. Often we hadn’t enough to eat. Whenever we had some food, Mother often gave me her portion of rice. While she was transferring her rice into my bowl, she would say, “Eat this rice, son, I’m not hungry.”

This was Mother’s First Lie.

As I grew, Mother gave up her spare time to fish in a river near our house; she hoped that from the fish she caught, she could give me a little bit more nutritious food for my growth. Once she had caught just two fish, she would make fish soup. While I was eating the soup, mother would sit beside me and eat what was still left on the bone of the fish I had eaten; my heart was touched when I saw it. Once I gave the other fish to her on my chopstick but she immediately refused it and said, “Eat this fish son, I don’t really like fish.”

This was Mother’s Second Lie.

Then, in order to fund my education, Mother went to a Match Factory to bring home some used matchboxes, which she filled with fresh matchsticks. This helped her get some money to cover our needs. One wintry night I awoke to find Mother filling the matchboxes by candlelight. So I said, “Mother, go to sleep; it’s late: you can continue working tomorrow morning.” Mother smiled and said, “Go to sleep son, I’m not tired.”

This was Mother’s Third Lie.

When I had to sit my Final Examination, Mother accompanied me. After dawn, Mother waited for me for hours in the heat of the sun. When the bell rang, I ran to meet her… Mother embraced me and poured me a glass of tea that she had prepared in a thermos. The tea was not as strong as my Mother’s love. Seeing Mother covered with perspiration, I at once gave her my glass and asked her to drink too. Mother said, “Drink son, I’m not thirsty!”

This was Mother’s Fourth Lie.

After Father’s death, Mother had to play the role of a single parent. She held on to her former job; she had to fund our needs alone. Our family’s life was more complicated. We suffered from starvation. Seeing our family’s condition worsening, my kind Uncle, who lived near my house, came to help us solve our problems big and small. Our other neighbors saw that we were poverty stricken so they often advised my mother to marry again. But Mother refused to remarry saying, “I don’t need love.”

This was Mother’s Fifth Lie.

After I had finished my studies and got a job, it was time for my old Mother to retire but she carried on going to the market every morning just to sell a few vegetables. I kept sending her money but she was steadfast and even sent the money back to me. She said, “I have enough money.”

That was Mother’s Sixth Lie.

I continued my part-time studies for my Master’s Degree. Funded by the American Corporation for which I worked, I succeeded in my studies. With a big jump in my salary, I decided to bring Mother to enjoy life in America but Mother didn’t want to bother her son. She said to me, “I’m not used to high living.”

That was Mother’s Seventh Lie.

In her dotage, Mother was attacked by cancer and had to be hospitalized. Now living far across the ocean, I went home to visit Mother who was bedridden after an operation. Mother tried to smile but I was heartbroken because she was so thin and feeble but Mother said, “Don’t cry son, I’m not in pain.”

That was Mother’s Eighth Lie.

Telling me this eighth lie, she died.
YES, MOTHER WAS AN ANGEL!

M – O – T – H – E – R

“M” is for the million things she gave me,
“O” means only that she’s growing old,
“T” is for the tears she shed to save me,
“H” is for her heart of gold,
“E” is for her eyes with love-light shining in them,
“R” means right , and right she’ll always be,

Put them all together, they spell “MOTHER”

… a word that means the world to me.

 

 

 

*credits to the author who happens to be “Anonymous”

Why We Love Mom

Our mothers are many times the unsung heroes of our lives. Whether it’s their endless encouragement or the example they set, our moms are crucial to every part of our lives and seldom ask for anything in return. It’s time we let mom know we appreciate all the things she has done for us.

Cake not tasted

October 15, 2010

My Dad’s Birthday was on the 12th but we chose to go to the cemetery today due to my work schedule and this was the first time we visited our Dad’s grave in a very long time. I’m with my two youngest siblings, Paolo and Jem Gem.

We went to the Cemetery, placed some flowers and lit two candles. The memory was so vivid during my Dad’s internment 6 years ago. It was gloomy and raining as if the sky was in sorrow, the rain drops as tears flow down on our cheeks as we took our final deep glance on the first man we knew and loved, our Dad.

After praying we headed straight to our Dad’s home in Manila where he grew up. We visited his 88 year old mom who happens to be our Grandma.

We had our early lunch together then talked and bonded for several hours. It was such a very nice feeling to talk to your Grandma who is very funny, it’s very fascinating because at her age, her memory was so sharp.  She knows every birthday of all of her 9 children and also the death days of the 5.

After hours of talking and laughing we left and went home.

Sadly, Dad didn’t get the chance of tasting this chocolate cake we bought for him. =(

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His Last Breath

His Last Breath

Living a life with something important that’s part of your everyday life is indeed fulfilling without thinking that that something will never leave you. It is more fulfilling if that something is a person who is very important in to you. A person, who shared his blood with you, shared the air that you breathe. A person who first taught you to be a good son, to respect women the same way you respect your mother. But what if that person left you to soon even before you can show to him that you loved him so dearly and that you appreciate him as your father?

 

My Dad passed away last June 2004; he was murdered by a suspect that no law of man can kill, “Cancer”. He was diagnosed of colon cancer late year 2003 and was confined in the hospital for more than 2 months last 2004. Series of tests and preparation was done for his operation but his body disagreed. He went home. After more or less than a month at home, he passed away. It was around 8 in the morning when I heard my mom cried his name. I saw my mom holding my Dad’s hand while praying. I am not sure if I am lucky or not to see how he gasped for his last breath. He’s gone.

That was the most sorrowful morning of my life. Waking up means new beginning, but on that day I woke up to witness how my Dad’s life ended. I did not cry but I was stunned. I knew that day was coming but not very soon. In a span of less than a year after he was diagnosed, cancer did all it can to murder my Dad.

I regret all the things that I have not done for him. There are still lots of “what ifs” going on in my mind up to this day. But one thing that I am proud of was to talk to him 6 hours before he died. That talk was very heart-breaking, emotional and painful. I did not know that it will be our last conversation but it seemed like it was a “reassurance-everything-is-okay talk”. And it turned out to be a “Letting Go”.

 

Today was supposed to be his 62nd Birthday; he stopped aging when he was 55 years old.

 

 

In Memoriam – Nicolas C. De Vera | October 12, 1948 – June 4, 2004

 

•NJayMaldito• 10122010 •

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