Eight Lies Of A Mother

 


This story begins when I was a child: I was born poor. Often we hadn’t enough to eat. Whenever we had some food, Mother often gave me her portion of rice. While she was transferring her rice into my bowl, she would say, “Eat this rice, son, I’m not hungry.”

This was Mother’s First Lie.

As I grew, Mother gave up her spare time to fish in a river near our house; she hoped that from the fish she caught, she could give me a little bit more nutritious food for my growth. Once she had caught just two fish, she would make fish soup. While I was eating the soup, mother would sit beside me and eat what was still left on the bone of the fish I had eaten; my heart was touched when I saw it. Once I gave the other fish to her on my chopstick but she immediately refused it and said, “Eat this fish son, I don’t really like fish.”

This was Mother’s Second Lie.

Then, in order to fund my education, Mother went to a Match Factory to bring home some used matchboxes, which she filled with fresh matchsticks. This helped her get some money to cover our needs. One wintry night I awoke to find Mother filling the matchboxes by candlelight. So I said, “Mother, go to sleep; it’s late: you can continue working tomorrow morning.” Mother smiled and said, “Go to sleep son, I’m not tired.”

This was Mother’s Third Lie.

When I had to sit my Final Examination, Mother accompanied me. After dawn, Mother waited for me for hours in the heat of the sun. When the bell rang, I ran to meet her… Mother embraced me and poured me a glass of tea that she had prepared in a thermos. The tea was not as strong as my Mother’s love. Seeing Mother covered with perspiration, I at once gave her my glass and asked her to drink too. Mother said, “Drink son, I’m not thirsty!”

This was Mother’s Fourth Lie.

After Father’s death, Mother had to play the role of a single parent. She held on to her former job; she had to fund our needs alone. Our family’s life was more complicated. We suffered from starvation. Seeing our family’s condition worsening, my kind Uncle, who lived near my house, came to help us solve our problems big and small. Our other neighbors saw that we were poverty stricken so they often advised my mother to marry again. But Mother refused to remarry saying, “I don’t need love.”

This was Mother’s Fifth Lie.

After I had finished my studies and got a job, it was time for my old Mother to retire but she carried on going to the market every morning just to sell a few vegetables. I kept sending her money but she was steadfast and even sent the money back to me. She said, “I have enough money.”

That was Mother’s Sixth Lie.

I continued my part-time studies for my Master’s Degree. Funded by the American Corporation for which I worked, I succeeded in my studies. With a big jump in my salary, I decided to bring Mother to enjoy life in America but Mother didn’t want to bother her son. She said to me, “I’m not used to high living.”

That was Mother’s Seventh Lie.

In her dotage, Mother was attacked by cancer and had to be hospitalized. Now living far across the ocean, I went home to visit Mother who was bedridden after an operation. Mother tried to smile but I was heartbroken because she was so thin and feeble but Mother said, “Don’t cry son, I’m not in pain.”

That was Mother’s Eighth Lie.

Telling me this eighth lie, she died.
YES, MOTHER WAS AN ANGEL!

M – O – T – H – E – R

“M” is for the million things she gave me,
“O” means only that she’s growing old,
“T” is for the tears she shed to save me,
“H” is for her heart of gold,
“E” is for her eyes with love-light shining in them,
“R” means right , and right she’ll always be,

Put them all together, they spell “MOTHER”

… a word that means the world to me.

 

 

 

*credits to the author who happens to be “Anonymous”

Why We Love Mom

Our mothers are many times the unsung heroes of our lives. Whether it’s their endless encouragement or the example they set, our moms are crucial to every part of our lives and seldom ask for anything in return. It’s time we let mom know we appreciate all the things she has done for us.

His Last Breath

His Last Breath

Living a life with something important that’s part of your everyday life is indeed fulfilling without thinking that that something will never leave you. It is more fulfilling if that something is a person who is very important in to you. A person, who shared his blood with you, shared the air that you breathe. A person who first taught you to be a good son, to respect women the same way you respect your mother. But what if that person left you to soon even before you can show to him that you loved him so dearly and that you appreciate him as your father?

 

My Dad passed away last June 2004; he was murdered by a suspect that no law of man can kill, “Cancer”. He was diagnosed of colon cancer late year 2003 and was confined in the hospital for more than 2 months last 2004. Series of tests and preparation was done for his operation but his body disagreed. He went home. After more or less than a month at home, he passed away. It was around 8 in the morning when I heard my mom cried his name. I saw my mom holding my Dad’s hand while praying. I am not sure if I am lucky or not to see how he gasped for his last breath. He’s gone.

That was the most sorrowful morning of my life. Waking up means new beginning, but on that day I woke up to witness how my Dad’s life ended. I did not cry but I was stunned. I knew that day was coming but not very soon. In a span of less than a year after he was diagnosed, cancer did all it can to murder my Dad.

I regret all the things that I have not done for him. There are still lots of “what ifs” going on in my mind up to this day. But one thing that I am proud of was to talk to him 6 hours before he died. That talk was very heart-breaking, emotional and painful. I did not know that it will be our last conversation but it seemed like it was a “reassurance-everything-is-okay talk”. And it turned out to be a “Letting Go”.

 

Today was supposed to be his 62nd Birthday; he stopped aging when he was 55 years old.

 

 

In Memoriam – Nicolas C. De Vera | October 12, 1948 – June 4, 2004

 

•NJayMaldito• 10122010 •

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Refresh: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

As you all know I am a Harry Potter addict/fan. I have read all the books and I can say all the changes the director made in the movies which is a bit frustrating. Well if JK Rowling allowed it, then who am I to question but I’m sure that you hate the feeling that you’re expecting to see something that you did not see because the director was like trying to be more creative than the person who wrote the entire film.

Let me just say that I am disappointed with the last film, the Half-Blood Prince because there are lots of not just revisions, those were CHANGES. Oh well.

Anyways, November is approaching and the 1st part of the Deathly Hallows is coming. As a reader and a fan, every time the book that you read will be adapted in a movie it is a normal thing to re-read the book to somewhat refresh your mind. The same thing I did before all the HP films and The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons of Dan Brown.

Reading DH before was easy because I’m at school when the book was released but since now I’m working 8 hours a day, I think I can read the whole book before the movie’s showing date. Oh yes, I know I can do it, I’m a wizard you know.

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12 Things Good Bosses Believe

12 Things Good Bosses Believe

From: Harvard Business Review

1. I have a flawed and incomplete understanding of what it feels like to work for me.

2. My success — and that of my people — depends largely on being the master of obvious and mundane things, not on magical, obscure, or breakthrough ideas or methods.

3. Having ambitious and well-defined goals is important, but it is useless to think about them much. My job is to focus on the small wins that enable my people to make a little progress every day.

4. One of the most important, and most difficult, parts of my job is to strike the delicate balance between being too assertive and not assertive enough.

5. My job is to serve as a human shield, to protect my people from external intrusions, distractions, and idiocy of every stripe — and to avoid imposing my own idiocy on them as well.

6. I strive to be confident enough to convince people that I am in charge, but humble enough to realize that I am often going to be wrong.

7. I aim to fight as if I am right, and listen as if I am wrong — and to teach my people to do the same thing.

8. One of the best tests of my leadership — and my organization — is “what happens after people make a mistake?”

9. Innovation is crucial to every team and organization. So my job is to encourage my people to generate and test all kinds of new ideas. But it is also my job to help them kill off all the bad ideas we generate, and most of the good ideas, too.

10. Bad is stronger than good. It is more important to eliminate the negative than to accentuate the positive.

11. How I do things is as important as what I do.

12. Because I wield power over others, I am at great risk of acting like an insensitive jerk — and not realizing it.

10 Attitudes of Successful Workers

10 Attitudes of Successful Workers

By Kate Lorenz, CareerBuilder.com Editor

Why do some people seem to reach the top of the corporate ladder easily, while others remain stuck on the middle-management rung? You might think that it is just because those people have more of what it takes to succeed, like brains, talent and powerful people in their corner. But there is something else that is just as important: attitude.

Dr. Martin Seligman, an authority on optimism, discovered that attitude was a better predictor of success than I.Q., education and most other factors. He found that positive people stay healthier, have better relationships and go further in their careers. And he even found that positive people make more money.

Anyone can adopt the right attitude. No matter where you are from or how much innate talent you have, the right attitude can make a difference in your career. Try adopting these 10 attitudes of successful workers:

1. I am in charge of my destiny.
If you spend your entire career waiting for something exciting to come to you, you will be waiting a long time. Successful professionals go out and make good things happen. So commit yourself to thinking about your career in an entirely different way. You will make it to the top, and you are in charge of making it happen.

2. Anything is possible.
Think that there is no way you will ever be at the vice-president level? Then you definitely won’t. Remember: If you think you can’t, you probably won’t. Adopt the attitude of The Little Engine That Could — “I think I can.”

3. No task is too small to do well.
You never know when you are going to be noticed. That is one reason to take pride in your work — all of it. One public relations executive in Chicago said that her first task in the PR department of a ballet company was reorganizing the supply closet. She tackled the project with gusto and was immediately noticed for her hard work and attention to detail. Remember this the next time you feel like slacking because you are working on a menial task.

4. Everyone is a potential key contact.
While you do need to be aggressive in the workplace, you can also go far by being nice to those around you. Do you think it’s unimportant to establish a good rapport with your boss’s secretary? Well, just try getting your meeting squeezed onto the schedule when you really need it. Be courteous to those around you — you never know when your past contacts will play a role in your future.

5. I was made to do this job… and the one above me.
If you spend your days feeling like you are not cut out to do the work you are responsible for, your performance will suffer. Your job may not be the perfect fit, but successful workers act like they are in their dream job, no matter where they are.

6. It’s not just what I know, but who I know.
Successful workers understand the importance of networking, both in and out of the office. You need to proactively establish professional contacts. Invite a colleague out to lunch. Go to the after-work happy hour. Join your professional association. Do your part to establish a networking path for your future.

7. What else can I do?
Since you are in charge of your destiny, it’s your job to look for ways to improve your professional self. Volunteer to take on an extra project. Learn a new skill that will make you more marketable. Stay late to help your co-workers. Successful workers don’t just complete the job and sign out — they look for additional ways to make their mark.

8. Failure will help pave the way to my success.
While it seems like some people never experience setbacks, the truth is everyone fails from time to time. The difference between successful and unsuccessful people is how they deal with failure. Those who find success are the ones who learn from mistakes and move on.

9. I am my own biggest fan.
Have you been waiting for someone in the office to recognize your talents and efforts? Maybe it’s time you start tooting your own horn. Step up and talk about your accomplishments and what you have done for the company. Successful workers know how to point out their achievements without sounding boastful.

10. My opportunity monitor is never turned off.
Yes, there will be days when you will want to just be happy with the status quo. But remember that successful workers are always on the lookout for opportunities to improve. Keep your eyes, ears and your mind open to new opportunities — you never know when you will discover the one that will change the course of your career!

Copyright 2006 CareerBuilder.com. All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without prior written authority.

Story Filed Monday, September 24, 2007 – 3:50 PM

Conyo Speak per University

Suicidal Sandwich

There were three friends: an Atenean, a La Sallite, and a UP student (so you know this story is fictional). Anyway, everyday, they met for lunch and ate their sandwiches.

UP: Putek!!! Peanut-butter sandwich na naman? Sawang-sawa na ako dito ah. Pag bukas, peanut butter sandwich na naman ang baon ko, magpapatiwakal na ako.

Ateneo: Darn!!! Roast beef sandwich again? I’m sick of this already. If I get another roast beef sandwich again tomorrow, I’m gonna shoot myself.

La Salle: Oh my gosh, grabe!!! Ham sandwich is my baon again. I’m so sawa with this sandwich na, ha? If my baon tomorrow is ham sandwich again, I’m gonna drive my CRV over the cliff.

The next morning, they again met for lunch, and, alas, they had the same sandwiches again.

The UP student went back to his dorm, pulled out a belt, and choked himself to death.

The Atenean went home, got a gun, and shot himself in the head.

The La Sallite drove his CRV off a cliff.

During their funeral, their mothers were interviewed:

UP: Kung sinabi niya lang sa akin na ayaw niya na nang peanut butter sandwich, eh di sana hindi na yun yung pinabaon ko sa kanya.

Ateneo: If he had told me that he didn’t want roast beef anymore, I wouldn’t have given him roast beef.

La Salle: Hindi ko maintindihan kung bakit siya nagpakamatay, eh siya naman yung gumagawa ng sarili niyang sandwich.

=======================================

Reaction to a Beautiful Woman

UP: Uy, ang ganda.

Ateneo: Wow, headturner.

La Salle: Hey, she’s got the look.

AMA: Miss, pa-autograph.

=======================================

Reaction to a Prostitute

Atenean: Whoa, look, there’s a prostitute!!!

UP Student: Uy, kalapating mababa ang lipad!!!

AMA Student: Oi, classmate!!!

=======================================

Favorite Looney Tunes Character

UP: Bugs Bunny

Ateneo: Daffy Duck

La Salle: Elmer Fudd

AMA: Marvin…. and Jolina

=======================================

Students in vehicles:

Ateneo: Get out of the f@#%$ng way!
La Salle: Oh My… can you move it please, I’m late na eh.
UST: Mama bayad oh….
UP: Sa kabila lang po ha, bawal magbaba dyan.